Dry Rubbed Slow-Roast Pork Shoulder

Oh yeah. This is one of those things that you’ll cook, and go back to again and again. Honestly, one of the nicest things I think I’ve made – so many compliments, and I’m so happy with it. Apologies for being late with the recipe – things have been a little busy, to say the least!

Ingredients

This is a long one…

  • One 2kg pork shoulder joint. Get bone-in if you can – the joint cooks quicker and will be juicier. I couldn’t.
  • 2tbsp sweet smoked paprika. Quite important to get the sweet stuff.
  • 1tbsp mild chilli powder
  • 1tbsp soft dark brown sugar
  • 1tbsp golden caster sugar
  • 1tbsp garlic powder (really, it’s great)
  • 2tsp ground coriander
  • 1tbsp salt, 1tbsp cracked black pepper
  • 1tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1tsp powdered ginger
  • 1tbsp dried mixed Italian herbs. You can get these in one go at the supermarket, but otherwise use a combination of thyme, oregano and rosemary. I’d actually go for dried over fresh in this case.

Recipe

Damn, my mouth is watering already. Like I said, if you can get a shoulder with the bone in, do. I couldn’t find one, so I got a good tied shoulder joint, with the skin already slit (this makes great crackling). Pat the pork dry using kitchen towel. Next, combine all the other ingredients above.

Liberally rub the dry rub onto the pork, making sure every bit is covered well. Some will come off, so rest the meat in a bowl, rolling it around in the other ingredients. Leave this to marinade for at least two hours.

Now for the cooking! As it’s nearly October, I’d understand if you didn’t want to barbecue this. It does work really well, though. In the oven, I’d guess about 3 hours on a slow, long roast at about 160 degrees. The thing with pork shoulder is that you want it really juicy and tender, and to get that, you need a slow roast. Leaving it on for several hours in a low oven is a great way to achieve that.

Soooo goooood...
But… you don’t get the smoky goodness! “Won’t it cook on the outside before on the inside, Matt?” you say. No! Because I used… that’s right… the indirect method. This is the only way to slow-cook pork on the barbecue. Charcoal on either side of the barbecue, leaving the centre charcoal-free. Put the pork in the middle, and leave it. Go out and do something, and come back in 3-4 hours. As long as you don’t open the barbecue, it will still be hot when you get back, and the pork will be deliciously moist and tender.


Don’t forget to (a) make sure the meat is done and (b) rest it wrapped in foil for 20 minutes before serving it! Cut into the deepest part – it’s best served shredded up anyway – to make sure there’s no pink remaining.

Seriously, you’re gonna love this. Give it a try – it’s my last recipe of the year!