All ye doubting thomases, repent. It's really nice.

Barbecue 18: June 28

Hello, barbecue fans! It’s time for… *drumroll* … another barbecue. This one featuring rain! We haven’t done it for a while, so this time we decided upon a good old roast chicken on the barbecue. Doubters, prepare to have your doubts cast asunder.

A parasol in a plastic chair, at an angle. I know - inspired.

Weather

That’s right: rain! I can’t believe I was a little excited about it. It hasn’t rained for the past 17 barbecues, so we used our ingenuity to shield the barbecue from rain whilst allowing it to continue cooking. They don’t call me ‘bearded’ for nothing, you know. Wait, that doesn’t work…

Anyway, the rain wasn’t bad enough that we were forced to give up, but Gemma did insist on eating inside. Oh well. It still counts.

Food

Usually, when we barbecue it’s just a case of “put the coals in the middle, put the food on top”. However, if you’re going to cook a roast chicken, that won’t work. As you might imagine, the heat from underneath would cook the chicken out before the top was even browned – not good. The solution is to have the heat coming from the sides of the barbecue (in barbecuing terminology, this is known as indirect heat cooking). It so happens that if you use a charcoal chimney, it’s much easier to do this. Most Weber barbecues come with guide rails to fit into the charcoal grate, so that you can keep the charcoal pushed to the sides, as shown in this picture. If you don’t have the rails, it’s not that important – just try to make two even piles either side.

All ye doubting thomases, repent. It's really nice.
Put a tray underneath what you’re cooking (the chicken) – this catches the drips, which stops your barbecue going rusty, and you can add flavours to it (wine or beer are good). Alas, I forgot to do this. Oh well, I’ll have to buy a new Weber… :) Right! Chicken on the cooking grate, in the middle of the charcoal. Lid on! This recipe doesn’t work if you don’t have a kettle barbecue that closes – the charcoal generates an oven. In my experience, a 1kg chicken takes about an hour, and comes out very succulent, and smokey flavoured. This time, I stuffed the cavity with 3 crushed garlic cloves, some oregano, thyme and lemon balm, and just seasoned and oiled the outside of the bird.

Towards the last ten minutes of cooking you can put other things directly onto the heat to cook – we did a few burgers. Of course, we didn’t eat this in one go. For dinner that evening was about half a chicken breast and a burger, with some salad. The rest was spread out over the week for packed lunches. Genius.

If you do have a kettle barbecue, I implore you to try this. You won’t regret doing so!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>